September 20, 2014

The Sparkles - ‘The Hip’ & ‘Oh, Girls’

10:28pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z79DRy1RF03Zz
Filed under: 60s garage 
September 20, 2014

new-aesthetic:

Top: A Syrian rebel uses a videogame controller to activate the machine gun of Sham 2, a homemade armored vehicle made by the rebels’ Al-Ansar brigade, in Bishqatin, 4 km west of Aleppo, on December 8, 2012. (Herve Bar/AFP/Getty Images)

Middle: A Syrian rebel walks past Sham 2, a homemade armored vehicle, in Bishqatin, Syria, on December 8, 2012. From a distance it looks rather like a big rusty metal box but closer inspection reveals a homemade armored vehicle waiting to be deployed. Sham II, named after ancient Syria, is built from the chassis of a car and touted by rebels as “100 percent made in Syria.” (Herve Bar/AFP/Getty Images)

Bottom: Free Syrian Army fighters use the electronic compass of a smartphone to help them aim a locally made anti-aircraft weapon near the Menagh military airport in Aleppo’s countryside, on February 17, 2013. (Reuters/Mahmoud Hassano)

DIY Weapons of the Syrian Rebels - In Focus - The Atlantic, via Tom A.

September 20, 2014
brucesterling:

http://www.nicolasnova.net/pasta-and-vinegar/2014/9/19/futures-a-short-interview-with-bruce-sterling

"This is the second interview of the series I started last week, based on my recent book about future, sci-fi and design fictions. After Warren Ellis, here’s Bruce Sterling (whose blogging have moved to this wonderful tumblr called ‘Wolf in Living Room’:
"NN: In your opinion, as a science-fiction writer, how to you perceive this difficulty to go beyond the standard visions of "the Future" (from flying cars to humanoid robots)?
"BS: At SXSW 2014 I was on a panel with Warren Ellis, Joi Ito and Daniel Suarez where an interesting atemporal design-fiction issue came up.  We science fiction writers were discussing the problem of inventing something far-fetched, satirical, extrapolative or socially critical and then discovering that it was already commercially available on the shelves of Wal-Mart.  This was immediately called the “Wal-Mart Problem.”
"Atemporally speaking, it’s clearly possible to write a form of "futuristic" science fiction in which all the "sci-fi gadgets" are already real objects in Wal-Mart. …"

brucesterling:

http://www.nicolasnova.net/pasta-and-vinegar/2014/9/19/futures-a-short-interview-with-bruce-sterling

"This is the second interview of the series I started last week, based on my recent book about future, sci-fi and design fictions. After Warren Ellis, here’s Bruce Sterling (whose blogging have moved to this wonderful tumblr called ‘Wolf in Living Room’:

"NN: In your opinion, as a science-fiction writer, how to you perceive this difficulty to go beyond the standard visions of "the Future" (from flying cars to humanoid robots)?

"BS: At SXSW 2014 I was on a panel with Warren Ellis, Joi Ito and Daniel Suarez where an interesting atemporal design-fiction issue came up.  We science fiction writers were discussing the problem of inventing something far-fetched, satirical, extrapolative or socially critical and then discovering that it was already commercially available on the shelves of Wal-Mart.  This was immediately called the “Wal-Mart Problem.”

"Atemporally speaking, it’s clearly possible to write a form of "futuristic" science fiction in which all the "sci-fi gadgets" are already real objects in Wal-Mart. …"

September 20, 2014

mylittleillumination:

Photos of a seance (1940)

I’ve Got Levitation 

(Source: ufothetruthisoutthere.blogspot.com)

September 20, 2014
"When truth is replaced by silence, the silence is a lie."

— Yevgeny Yevtushenko (via arkitextura)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

September 20, 2014
luvyourselfsomeesteem:

The children know

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

The children know

(Source: nospt, via beeftown)

September 20, 2014
"The first draft is just you telling yourself the story."

— Terry Pratchett (via dorkstrangerfilmschool)

September 20, 2014

Chakachas - ‘Jungle Fever’ (1972)

September 20, 2014
"It was long the case that men would grovel upon the
earth,
crushed beneath the weight of Superstition whose head
loomed in the heavens, glaring down with her dreadful
visage
until Epicurus of Greece dared to look up and confront her,
taking a stand against the fables and myths of the gods
with their stories of those impending thunderbolts from
above
and the vengeful roar of the skies that merely provoked
his courage
and strengthened his will to defy them and shatter the bars
of the cage
where Nature was kept in confinement."

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura, 
50 B.C.E.

This ancient poem offers one of the most eloquent arguments for the supremacy of science over religion and magic. 

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/lucretius/s,  De Rerum Natura (via randombeautysls)

(via palimpsestsofhistory)

September 20, 2014

Peter Capaldi on the hardest part of being The Doctor
[x]

(Source: dadskills)